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Carbines of the Civil War. 1861-1865  McAulay. Carbines of the Civil War. 1861-1865 McAulay.

Covers only the best known carbines which were produced by the United States Government for use by their troops during the Civil War. Includes patent drawings, and the patent papers are quoted from freely in the coverage of each gun. Lists of procurement by months. Fully illustrated.

Our Price: $45.00
Firepower From Abroad. The Confederate and LeMat Revolver.Sword Firepower From Abroad. The Confederate and LeMat Revolver.Sword

This affordable book studies the both the Confederate Enfield and Lemat Revolver. Hard cover, 7 x 9-1/2", black and white photos.

The Table of Contents includes the following:
Section 1 The Confederate Enfield
Introduction
Initial Shipment
Heavy Shipments Begin
The Gladiator Enfields
1862 Arrivals
Battle Usage
The Confederate Enfield Profile
'JS' Anchor Markings
Other Related Markings
The London Armory Contract
Conclusion
Appendix I
Appendix II
Appendix III
Bibliography
Section 2 Caleb Huse and The Grapeshot Revolver
Correspondence On The LeMat Contract
Section 3 Confederate Ordnance Notes
New Data On A Variety Of Small Arms

Our Price: $45.00
Civil War Pistols. McAulay Civil War Pistols. McAulay

This book, by an established authority in the field, covers the handguns of the War between the States, pistol by pistol, including government procurement information, issue details and historical background.

Our Price: $50.00
Cosmopolitan and Gwyn and Campbell Carbines in the Civil War.  Rentscher Cosmopolitan and Gwyn and Campbell Carbines in the Civil War. Rentscher

Cosmopolitan and Gwyn & Campbell Carbines in the Civil War is a definitive illustrated history of two rare and unusual Civil War cavalry carbines, their development, sales to the government, use in the field by specifically known regiments, capture and use by Southern troops, surplus sales after the war, survival rates, and their present scarcity in the collectors' market. Included are complete descriptions and illustrations of each make, type, and model, including the mass produced types, transitional variations, as well as illustrations of rare rifles and early carbines.

This is more than a gun identification book. It contains many illustrations, text, anecdotes, historical references, footnotes, and commentary about the actual use of these carbines in several exciting and pivotal campaigns, including western Virginia in 1861, Grierson's Raid and Morgan's Raid. There are three never-before-published photographs of cavalry troopers,including the only one known with a Cosmopolitan Carbine.

The Cosmopolitan and Gwyn & Campbell are often called the only contract arms made in the Midwest, and a section of this book revisits that perspective. Another section describes modern-day shooting of a Gwyn & Campbell and the results of the experiment.The author has studied these guns over more than four decades, and has examined the lion's share of extant specimens, adding the knowledge gleaned from these studies to the surviving records and the research of others to create an encompassing and compelling microcosm of arms and cavalry troops in the Civil War.

Cosmopolitan and Gwyn & Campbell Carbines in the Civil War will prove to be interesting reading for arms collectors and students, whatever type of Civil War arm is favored; and it will interest those with a general curiosity of that war because of the inclusion of descriptions of soldiering, the cavalry trooper's horse and equipment, several 1860s photographs of cavalrymen, general and obscure facts about the war, and the volume of detail about these specific carbines and the many other types also used during that great conflict.

Our Price: $55.00
They Fought like Demons. Blanton, Cook. They Fought like Demons. Blanton, Cook.


“Albert Cashier” served three years in the Union Army and passed successfully as a man until 1911 when the aging veteran was revealed to be a woman named Jennie Hodgers. Frances Clayton kept fighting even after her husband was gunned down in front of her at the Battle of Murfreesboro. And more than one soldier astonished “his” comrades-in-arms by giving birth in camp.


This lively and authoritative book opens a hitherto neglected chapter of Civil War history, telling the stories of hundreds of women who adopted male disguise and fought as soldiers. It explores their reasons for enlisting; their experiences in combat, and the way they were seen by their fellow soldiers and the American public. Impeccably researched and narrated with verve and wit, They Fought Like Demons is a major addition to our understanding of the Civil War era.

Our Price: $55.00
Sharpshooting in the Civil War. Plaster Sharpshooting in the Civil War. Plaster

Here is the single greatest volume ever published about Civil War sharpshooting, from the expert perspective of world-renowned sniping and shooting authority John L. Plaster.
Comprehensive in scope, this book details how sharpshooters were recruited, trained, and organized. Plaster fully explores their armaments, their tactics and techniques, and how they operated (sometimes decisively) in battle. Discover dozens of accomplished and colorful but forgotten sharpshooters who, until now, had faded into the past.
Exhaustively researched and profusely illustrated, these pages contain more than 160 rare photos, along with original artwork.

Our Price: $55.00
Sharpshooter. Sword. Sharpshooter. Sword.

Sharpshooter: Hiram Berdan, His Famous Sharpshooters and their Sharps Rifles by Wiley Sword

This detailed dissertation on the Berdan Sharpshooters and their favourite weapon gives the reader some interesting information on this famous regiment. Details include serial numbering of the various weapons, years of production, etc. An interesting read for the re-enactor, Civil War history buff, collector or hobbiest!

Our Price: $55.00
Civil War Guns. Edwards. Civil War Guns. Edwards.

Secondhand, no dustcover, G Cond.
A detailed, photographically illustrated examination of the production and use of firearms in the North and the South during the years of the Civil War

Our Price: $55.00
Civil War Carbines. Myths and Reality. Schiffers Civil War Carbines. Myths and Reality. Schiffers

Shooting original Civil War carbines with carefully reproduced ammo; explains why some carbines performed well in combat & others did not. A unique mix of research & test firing results provides amazing & surprising insights for Civil War carbine collectors. 144 pgs.


Shooting original Civil War carbines with carefully reproduced ammunition, the author is able to explain why some carbines performed well in combat and others did not. A unique mix of research and test firing results provides amazing and surprising insights for Civil War carbine collectors.

Our Price: $60.00
Civil War Collectors Encyclopedia. Lord Civil War Collectors Encyclopedia. Lord

This comprehensive reference will be invaluable to anyone requiring accurate data on the Civil War period. Indispensable for identifying, describing, and understanding the use of more than 800 items, the text is arranged alphabetically by topic, with subjects ranging from artillery accouterments, heavy cannon, boats, and barracks equipment to bridge materials, a charcoal water filter, brass name stencils (to label personal equipment), and an enormous variety of weapons. Material is cross-referenced for quick location of individual entries. "Everything an interested reader would want to know . . . A must-have book." — Antiques & Auction News. Over 350 rare illustrations.

Our Price: $75.00
Swords of the American Civil War.  Bezdek Swords of the American Civil War. Bezdek

Many books have explored in depth the firearms, uniforms and paraphernalia carried by combatants in the American Civil War, but the swords carried by Union and Confederate enlisted men and officers have never been completely examined in print - until now.Swords of the American Civil War is a complete photographic survey of all the swords - Union and Confederate - used in the Civil War. It contains more than 700 magnificent photographs showing every type and style of sword, including more than 300 Union and Confederate regulation swords, 45 swords presented to Union and Confederate generals, 40 Union and Confederate presentation-grade swords, 60 Union and Confederate swords engraved with the owners' names, and 150 Union and Confederate identified presentation swords along with the presentee's Civil War records.

A fantastic chapter on the Civil War activities of Gen. George Armstrong Custer includes more than 30 never-before-published photos of Custer's presentation sword, dress uniform and personal equipment captured by Confederate cavalry at the Battle of Trevilian Station. The appendix provides additional little-known details on the fate of Custer's personal effects. This book is an essential reference for all collectors, historians, researchers and students.

Our Price: $85.00
The Confederate Morse Carbine. Schiffers The Confederate Morse Carbine. Schiffers

One of the rarest longarms of the Civil War and the first American firearm to use centrefire ammunition. This new book covers the first accurate account of the Morse carbine’s production figures and manufacturing dates, as well as a full history of the armoury in South Carolina where they were produced, refuting claims that they were produced in Atlanta! Also includes details about which South Carolina units were issued these unique carbines and why.

Our Price: $85.00
US Military Flintlock Muskets and their Bayonets.  Schmidt US Military Flintlock Muskets and their Bayonets. Schmidt

The concluding volume of what is now recognized as the most useful reference ever produced on the Flintlock Military Muskets of the United States. In this volume covering the second half of the flintlock era, learn the correct, and incorrect, configurations for these historical longarms. Study the markings and inspection stamps that separate rare muskets from run-of-the-mill examples. Based upon decades of research at the national Archives, this book follows a first volume that covered the years 1790 through 1815. While each books stands on its own, together they chronicle the most exciting story in firearms history, as our national arsenals and private contractors achieved interchangeability of parts and changed manufacturing forever.

Our Price: $90.00
Dance & Brothers. Texas Gunmakers of the Confederacy. Wiggins. Dance & Brothers. Texas Gunmakers of the Confederacy. Wiggins.

Signed and Dated by the Author, Gary Wiggins, 8-31-86

DANCE BROTHERS. Civil War firearms manufactured by J. H. Dance and Company are among the most highly prized antique weapons, valued for their fine craftsmanship as well as their rarity. From July 1862 through May 1865 the company produced six-shot Colt-pattern revolvers in both .44 and .36 caliber; total output was fewer than 400. The Dance family, originally residents of North Carolina, moved to Daniels Prairie in Greene County, Alabama, around 1835. In 1848 James Henry Dance traveled to Brazoria County, Texas, and in 1853 he moved to Texas with most of his family, including father, brothers, cousins, and slaves. The family jointly purchased 450 acres of land in the Cedar Brake section, where they established a plantation. In 1858 they built a spacious home in the thriving riverport town of East Columbia, on the Brazos River. Across the street from their residence they opened a manufactory for metal and woodwork, named J. H. Dance and Company and operated by James Henry Dance and his brothers David Etheldred and George Perry. J. H. Dance and Company prospered before the Civil War manufacturing gristmills and cotton gins.
At the outbreak of the war James Dance enlisted in the Brazoria Volunteers; he later became first lieutenant in the Thirty-fifth Texas Cavalry. His brothers George, David, and Isaac enlisted, but because of their abilities and skills they were detailed to their steam factory at Columbia by early May 1862. Isaac died of measles in 1863. Initially the Dances' primary tasks were mounting cannons and repairing wagons for the Confederate Army and grinding cornmeal for Bates Company. In April 1862 George Dance wrote Governor F. R. Lubbock requesting an advance of $5,000. He claimed that this sum would enable the Dances to begin firearm production with an output of fifty revolvers a week. Evidently they received some aid, for on July 5, 1862, a letter written by George's cousin Mattie Duff states that "the boys think they will soon get some three or four of their pistols finished." While production may have been at a somewhat slower pace than originally anticipated, by October 2, 1862, the Dances were able to ship a dozen revolvers to the San Antonio Arsenal.
By November 1863 the Dances had decided to sell their business to the Confederate government. Cousin Mattie wrote that "the boys think it quite possible they will quit the shop soon" and added that George had left for Houston "to see if he could make a government affair of it." Further, "he thinks perhaps it will be done." Revolver production had come to an end in East Columbia by December 10, 1863, and Mattie wrote that she had been "in town all week helping the boys to leave."
The federal occupation of Matagorda Island, located just off the Texas coast near Brazoria County, prompted the belief that the county was about to be invaded. The Confederate government doubtless wanted to consolidate the Dances' skills farther inland and out of harm's way. The Dances relocated to a site three miles north of Anderson in Grimes County, and here the Confederate government built a powder mill and pistol factory. On February 7, 1864, Mattie Duff received word from Uncle Harrison that "they were not quite ready for making pistols but soon will." One of the last known shipments of Dance revolvers took place on April 18, 1865; a lot of twenty-five six-shot pistols was sent from Anderson to the Houston Depot of Supplies. At the end of the war the Dances returned to East Columbia and the manufacture of gristmills and cotton gins.

Our Price: $140.00
Round Ball to Rimfire: A History of Civil War Small Arms Ammunition. Part 2. Thomas. Round Ball to Rimfire: A History of Civil War Small Arms Ammunition. Part 2. Thomas.

Round Ball to Rimfire. Part 2,
Federal breechloading carbines and rifles.
EX Cond, Mylar covered

Detailing the story of the twenty-seven or so different kinds of breechloaders actually purchased or ordered by the Ordnance Department during the Civil War. Conveniently divided by the type of priming , external or internal , and then alphabetically by maker or supplier.

Our Price: $150.00
Round Ball to Rimfire: A History of Civil War Small Arms Ammunition. Part 3. Thomas. Round Ball to Rimfire: A History of Civil War Small Arms Ammunition. Part 3. Thomas.

Round Ball to Rimfire. Part 3,
Federal pistols, revolvers & misc. essays
EX Cond, Mylar covered

Detailing the story of the twenty-seven or so different kinds of breechloaders actually purchased or ordered by the Ordnance Department during the Civil War. Conveniently divided by the type of priming , external or internal , and then alphabetically by maker or supplier.

Our Price: $150.00
Firearms of the Confederacy. Fuller, Steuart. Firearms of the Confederacy. Fuller, Steuart.

1st Edn 1944
No dust jacket
V G Cond
Hard to Find Original book

The shoulder arms, pistols & revolvers of the Confederate Soldier, including the regular U.S. models, the imported arms & those manufactured within the Confederacy.

Our Price: $175.00